Alex Garcia-Osuna, L.Ac., LMT

Welcome! I am a New York State Licensed Acupuncturist and Massage Therapist. I offer a wide variety of services based on Traditional East Asian Medicine geared toward helping patients achieve and maintain vibrant health, while also teaching the benefits of being proactive so that they may maintain healthy and active lifestyles well into old age.

I began my studies of East Asia at the University of Rochester where I received a Bachelor of Arts in Japanese, as well as a certificate in International Relations.

I received my Master of Traditional Chinese Medicine from Pacific College in New York City, and have completed postgraduate training in Kyojung (Korean physical manipulation) and classical Acupuncture needling techniques.

To view my CV, please click here.

Office Information

40 Exchange Place, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10005 (TRS Inc.)
For more information, please call or send an e-mail:
Phone: 347-625-7242
E-Mail: alex@mushinacupuncture.com

Treatment

Traditional East Asian Medicine

Whether you suffer from back pain, have a cold, or just want to maintain your overall level of wellness, chances are Traditional East Asian Medicine can help. The treatment modalities employed in this system include acupuncture and moxibustion, herbal medicine and dietary advice, physical manipulation (e.g., Kyojung), and qigong.

During the initial visit, a patient's condition is assessed by using traditional methods such as pulse palpation and tongue diagnosis. Together with the information provided in the medical history questionnaire, a treatment plan is then formulated, and recommendations are given based on one or more of the treatment methods of Traditional East Asian Medicine.

Schedule an Appointment

To inquire about appointments, please call at 347-625-7242, or send an e-mail to alex@mushinacupuncture.com. If I am with a patient or otherwise unable to take your call or read your e-mail, please rest assured that I will get back to you as soon as possible.

Office Hours

By appointment

*I will be out of the office and may not have regular access to voicemail from 12/17/2014 through 1/4/2015. I will be returning on 1/5/2015. To schedule an appointment, please send an e-mail to the address above.*

Current Promotions - Subject to Change Without Notice

  • I offer generous discounts for seniors, full-time students, and civil servants.

    Even with such discounts, it may still not be feasible to get treatments on a regular and consistent basis. If so, I will help you to locate a Community Acupuncture practice or a student intern clinic at a Traditional Chinese Medicine school.

Gift Certificates

Give your loved ones a gift certificate from Mushin Acupuncture.

Mushin Acupuncture gift certificates may be redeemed for any treatment within 1 year of purchase.

Value

Contact Information

E-Mail: alex@mushinacupuncture.com
Phone: 347-625-7242
40 Exchange Place, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10005
(Inside TRS Inc.)

Please send an e-mail or call if you have any questions, or if you would like more information about appointments and future classes. To receive news from Mushin Acupuncture, please subscribe below.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Acupuncture generally is not a painful experience. However, the techniques used vary depending on the presentation/patient.

    Acupuncture needles are extremely thin, flexible, and most are no thicker than a human hair. When they are inserted one may feel a slight pinching or pricking, followed by pressure, warmth, or a tingling sensation. Some may feel this traveling to other parts of the body. This is a good sign, for it indicates the "arrival of Qi." This is the first step in restoring the normal flow of Qi in the body. In many cases, needles are left in place for about 30 minutes, although this is only one of many techniques used in acupuncture. For some patients, needles may be manipulated and removed soon after.

  • A great number of health concerns, both acute and chronic, can be treated successfully with Traditional East Asian Medicine (which includes acupuncture).

    Click here to read the World Health Organization's review and analysis of reports on acupuncture clinical trials.

  • My particular areas of interest include digestive disorders, men's health, and sports rehabilitation. However, Traditional East Asian Medicine (which includes acupuncture) is holistic, so it is more accurate to think of Licensed Acupuncturists as general practitioners. We look at every individual as a whole, and place a lot of emphasis on disease prevention. We strive to address both the root cause of the problem and its symptoms, while teaching the patient how to stay healthy and prevent illness if possible.

  • I strive to help patients get better as quickly as possible by combining different treatment modalities (i.e. acupuncture, herbal medicine, etc.).

    During the first visit, I can assess whether or not it may be possible to treat the patient's condition(s), and if so, set up a treatment plan. These typically consist of 6-8 weekly or bi-weekly visits, although they vary depending on factors such as how long the condition has been present and the patient's overall health and constitution. If the problem is beyond my scope of practice, I refer the patient to the appropriate medical practitioner(s).

    If the patient does respond to treatment, and once there has been significant improvement, treatments can be dialed back gradually until regular visits are no longer necessary. At this point, maintenance of health is key, both through periodic maintenance treatments, and adherence to relevant lifestyle changes.

  • You can find this information online at the New York State Education Department's website:

    New York State Online License Verification


If you feel you have an emergency or life-threatening condition, please call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Additional Information

http://www.mushinacupuncture.com/wordpress/
  • What is Traditional East Asian Medicine?

    Date September 04, 2012

    Traditional East Asian Medicine is a more accurate description of the medicine many of us practice. Specifically, it refers to the medicine practiced in the Sinitic Sphere (China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam). These four countries shared a fundamental unity in that they all adopted a Confucian based form of government. This shaped their culture, which […] Read more